Enter the Void

Labelled a “psychedelic melodrama” by its director, cinematic troublemaker Gaspar Noé (Irreversible), Enter the Void follows a young drug dealer through a neon Tokyo and transcendent experiences both before and after his death.

Shot in a first-person perspective, Enter the Void unfolds over the shoulder of Oscar (Nathaniel Brown) and through his eyes as he navigates the seedy side of Tokyo. Oscar has intense drug experiences on DMT and travels through time and space after being shot by police, inspired by the teachings of The Tibetan Book of the Dead. Still possessing a strong bond to his sister (Paz de la Huerta) after his ignoble shooting in a bathroom stall, Oscar relives their shared memories and watches over her from high above a trippy Tokyo as his soul embarks on his final journey.

Dividing critics and audiences, Enter the Void’s running time had to be reduced in the U.S. for contractual reasons. Noé’s solution was to simply remove a whole reel of film (around 17 minutes), saying none of this material was necessary for the film.

Trailers

Directed by

Written by

Drama, Fantasy

162mins

Rating: R18 Explicit sex scenes and drug use

France, Germany, Italy, Canada

Official Site

Empire (UK)

press

Definitely won't be everyone's cup of tea.

Time Out New York

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A strong contender for both the artiest drug movie and the druggiest art movie ever made.

Little White Lies (UK)

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Nauseating and revelatory. Like being on acid, only not.

Guardian (UK)

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This is a grandiose hallucinatory journey into, and out of, hell: drugged, neon-lit and with a fully realised nightmare-porn aesthetic that has to be seen to be believed.

Total Film (UK)

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Beyond the daft comparisons with 2001, this is a mature film from a director who's morphing from eye-rolling agitator into eye-catching artist.

New York Times

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[Noe is] using pure cinema and not just cheap exploitation tricks to make an impact.

Variety (USA)

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Not clever enough to be truly pretentious, Noe's tiresomely gimmicky film... proves to be the ne plus ultra of nothing much.