World Trade Centre

Out Now On-Demand

Two Port Authority police officers, John McLoughlin (Cage) - a veteran of the 1993 WTC bombing, rushes into the breach on 9/11 knowing that no adequate plan exists to deal with a catastrophe of this magnitude - and Will Jimeno (Pe?a) - a rookie [with] a desire to prove himself on the job and also distinct shadings of fear, both the worry that he’ll mess up and, as the hours go by, a much deeper terror.

The pair become trapped deep in the rubble of the collapsed towers where they had gone to help with the evacuation after the first plane hit. Starting before dawn on Sept. 11 and covering roughly the next 24 hours, the narrative switches back and forth from the men to their families, in particular the wives, who spend agonized hours waiting for news of their husbands’ fates. [New York Times]

Trailers

Directed by

Written by

Action, Drama

125mins

Rating: M contains low level offensive language

USA

Official Site

flicks

The inherent dramatics of 9/11, and the intensity of being at ground zero as it occurred, are the reasons why 'World Trade Centre' is somewhat worth watching. The performances are sometimes riveting, sometimes unbelievable. Oliver Stone doesn’t handle personal drama well – with all limbs flailing he falls back on the cheese. Flashbacks to happy times with family all awash in a golden glow, predictable dialogue, and an over the top, heavy score adds to the film’s soft centre. At times, you’d think it was a Jerry Bruckheimer film.

There are moments when you realise the hell these people went through, it’s a bit of a tear-jerker, and you leave with huge admiration for the rescue teams. But these moments are nearly out-weighed by distracting and needless sentimentality.

[By PS].

BBC

press

polar opposite to the nerve-jangling leanness of Paul Greengrass's United 93. It's a stodgy, sappy, intensely earnest film marinaded in the fuzzy morality of the Hollywood mainstream. Despite being true, it feels fictional: a distillation of human values rather than an objective chronicle. That's not necessarily a bad thing; to tell the truth, it's rather comforting

Empire Magazine [UK]

press

Even without his box of political tricks, Oliver Stone remains the foremost cinematic shrink for America’s distress...

New York Times

press

In the Sept. 11 of “World Trade Center,” feeling transcends politics, and the film’s astonishingly faithful re-creation of the emotional reality of the day produces a curious kind of nostalgia. It’s not that anyone would wish to live through such agony again, but rather that the extraordinary upsurge of fellow feeling that the attacks produced seems precious. And also very distant from the present. Mr. Stone has taken a public tragedy and turned it into something at once genuinely stirring and terribly sad. His film offers both a harrowing return to a singular, disastrous episode in the recent past and a refuge from the ugly, depressing realities of its aftermath...

Rolling Stone [USA] (Peter Travers)

press

Oliver Stone has made a cautious, earnestly factual and emotionally unassailable film. What he has not made is an Oliver Stone movie... 'World Trade Center' takes the point of view of two men with no clear idea of what's going on. "What happened to the buildings?" asks Jimeno when his rescuers lift him out of the hole. The deeper implications of those words raise hot-button issues that Stone has tabled for now. His film is undeniably affecting, but you leave it wanting more...

Variety [USA]

press

Yields lovely and touching moments but proves a slow-going, arduous movie experience, if more uplifting than Universal's earlier "United 93"...

Not too bad!

user


Not too bad!

Well, I am a Cage fan from way back and his performance is a fine one in this touching true story about two New York Police Officers trapped underneath the rubble of the collapsed World Trade Centre. I thought it was respectfully done, real and disturbing. I'm glad I saw it, it was thought provoking. Real Heroes.


My review

Needless to say, a very sad story. I would definetely recommend but doesn't compare with United 93 as a film. United 93 is a unique film, World Trade Centre is far more a 'movie' movie.

'Pain is your friend, it lets you know you're not dead yet'

user


'Pain is your friend, it lets you know you're not dead yet'

It was a welcomed suprise to not be bombarded by the red, white and blue fluttering in the breeze every second scene. Still, the film does a good job of recognising the heroism of those who went up and didnt come back, regardless of your political view. Very sobering if a little dramatic at times.

Review

user


Review

Oliver Stone's vivid and emotional interpretation of the heroics of two PAPD officers on the fateful day in 2001 does well to share the pain and despair of families and those who risked their lives in an attempt to save others. However, the film is let down by Stone's cheesy bible-crusading love for the US Marine Corps (for which he served in the Vietnam war). The duo of Nicolas Cage (consistently rock solid) and Michael Pe?a (superb in Crash) provide plenty of heart warming moments. And the audience was left wiping tears away which this reviewer unfortunately could not do as the reefer had dried my eyes out.

World Trade Centre is an eye-opening tribute to those brave folk from the NYPD, PAPD and FDNY who paid the ultimate price for their courage and bravery.